#buildingconservation

On this day – 18th December

After years of deliberation and research the University of Leicester and the National Museum of Wales focused their efforts into putting together a team of geologists for the purpose of discovering the exact source of the rock used to create Stonehenge’s first stone circle.

On this day in 2011 the team of geologists dedicated to this task announced that they’ve pinpointed the source as a 70 metre long rock outcrop called Craig Rhos-y-Felin, near Pont Saeson in north Pembrokeshire.

Stonehenge at sunset, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom
Stonehenge at sunset, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom, Europe. Image credit: https://www.mediastorehouse.com/worldinprint/stonehenge-sunset-unesco-world-heritage-site-1149676.html

The discovery made by the geologists (reported in the journal, Archaeology in Wales) does not solve the mystery of how Stonehenge’s Welsh originating stones ended up in England, but it does potentially open up the possibility of finding archaeological evidence of quarrying activity that could indicate a human rather than glacial explanation.

The detective work that the University of Leicester and the National Museum of Wales scientists had to carry out to pinpoint the precise Pembrokeshire source of many of these fragments, was extremely complex but well worth the hard work.

If it was human effort that delivered the stones from Pembrokeshire (Craig Rhos-y-Felin) to the location of Stonehenge, this does mean that Craig Rhos-y-Felin could have some very interesting cultural implications hidden in history.

IMAG1005
Pembrokeshire, Craig Rhos-y-Felin. Image credit: http://www.sarsen.org/2014/04/craig-rhos-y-felin.html

Stonehenge Facts:

1. Built in several stages, Stonehenge began about 5,000 years ago as a simple earthwork enclosure where prehistoric people buried their cremated dead. The stone circle was erected in the centre of the monument in the late Neolithic period, around 2500 BC.

2. Two types of stone are used at Stonehenge: the larger sarsens, and the smaller bluestones. There are 83 stones in total.

3. There were originally only two entrances to the enclosure, English Heritage explains – a wide one to the north east, and a smaller one on the southern side. Today there are many more gaps – this is mainly the result of later tracks that once crossed the monument.

4. A circle of 56 pits, known as the Aubrey Holes (named after John Aubrey, who identified them in 1666), sits inside the enclosure. Its purpose remains unknown, but some believe the pits once held stones or posts.

5. Roman pottery, stone, metal items and coins have been found during various excavations at Stonehenge. An English Heritage report in 2010 said that considerably fewer medieval artefacts have been discovered, which suggests the site was used more sporadically during the period.

6. Stonehenge has a long relationship with astronomers, the report explains. In 1720, Dr Halley used magnetic deviation and the position of the rising sun to estimate the age of Stonehenge. He concluded the date was 460 BC. And, in 1771, John Smith mused that the estimated total of 30 sarsen stones multiplied by 12 astrological signs equalled 360 days of the year, while the inner circle represented the lunar month.

7. The first mention of Stonehenge – or ‘Stanenges’ – appears in the archaeological study of Henry of Huntingdon in about AD 1130, and that of Geoffrey of Monmouth six years later. In 1200 and 1250 it appeared as ‘Stanhenge’ and ‘Stonhenge’; as ‘Stonheng’ in 1297, and ‘the stone hengles’ in 1470. It became known as ‘Stonehenge’ in 1610, says English Heritage.

8. In the 1880s, after carrying out some of the first scientifically recorded excavations at the site, Charles Darwin concluded that earthworms were largely to blame for the Stonehenge stones sinking through the soil.

9. By the beginning of the 20th century there had been more than 10 recorded excavations, and the site was considered to be in a “sorry state”, says English Heritage – several sarsens were leaning. Consequently the Society of Antiquaries lobbied the site’s owner, Sir Edmond Antrobus, and offered to assist with conservation.

stonehenge-360-1

Information taken from History Extra – September 11, 2014.

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Incorporated in 2006, Aura Conservation have existed for over twelve successful years. We have a sound and experienced management team. We can assist you in any of your conservation needs and have a body of long standing and experienced tradesmen we can call on with specialist knowledge of the conservation world. Along with prudent financial management, we have a sound financial foundation that will see us prosper in the coming years.

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